Artist Hans Haacke | AS w4

Wikipedia says so,

This group was held together with common motivations: the longing to re-harmonize man and nature and to restore art’s metaphysical dimension.

When it is talking about Hans was a member of a group called Zero at that time. I pretty much like the group’s description, cuz I also like to do work related to nature.

But later in his piece, his interest in real-time systems propelled him into his criticism of social and political systems. In my opinion, it is like a reflection of the growth of human-kind. At first you tend to be more related to nature, cuz you are born out of nature, you have not stepped into the human society before. But later, as you growing up, more and more surrounding things are related to the man-made society, therefore, more attention will be taken into that realm.

So here is an interview that Hans is talking about one of his site-specific work, to trigger this kind of public conversation between museum and public, between social problems and people’s reaction.

 

But the following words that he says in another interview, I could not agree more.

If you take a grand view, you can divide the world into three or four categories – the physical, biological, the social and behavioural – each of them having interrelations with the others at one point or another. There is no hierarchy. All of them are important for the upkeep of the total system. It could be that there are times when one of these categories interests you more than another. So, for example, I now spend more thought on things in the social field, but simultaneously I am preparing a large water-cycle for the Guggenheim show that uses the peculiarities of the building.

The reason why I felt this resonate, probably because I also believe in that none of the thing can be separated completely. We all live in this mixture of the world – nature and human society. We all follow certain rules, or let me put in this way, all of the consequence that we are facing now may come from certain same origins, like a source, and later on they might fork or cross with each other and create more interesting form of living. That is also something answers my following question.

His following piece reminds me of a show I saw in Japan.

This is the exhibit in Japan, I don’t know if Shinji Ohmaki is influenced by Hans but as Hans says in one of his interview,

” The physical, biological, the social and behavioural, There is no hierarchy.” As it all comes from the natural system and everyone can make their own art by interpreting them.

One Comment

  1. Marina Zurkow

    I want to take two comments of yours and bring them forward for discussion:

    “If you take a grand view, you can divide the world into three or four categories – the physical, biological, the social and behavioural – each of them having interrelations with the others at one point or another. There is no hierarchy. All of them are important for the upkeep of the total system. ”
    and
    ” The physical, biological, the social and behavioural, There is no hierarchy.” As it all comes from the natural system and everyone can make their own art by interpreting them.

    So… I am wondering what you really mean when you say it all comes form the natural system? And what you mean by “interpreting?”
    I would also love to have you try and articulate where – beyond the surface – you see parallels between Haacke’s and Ohmaki’s works?

    I didn’t know Ohmaki’s work – it’s very light and inviting and sensual. His site states his intent is to “awaken people’s senses” which is different from discovering the connections between things, agents, and systems. Or is it?

    What you zeroed in on in Haacke’s work – in the quotes you fond – is exactly what we were talking about in class – systems thinking interrelationships. Revealing hidden forces and hidden effects of one thing or system upon another (be that environment/condensation or real estate ownership and museums)

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